walking the line

Nihill Place in Croydon has been named after the local race walker, Paul Nihill, and now the public art is installed the new development is complete.

Tom Pearman has produced a suite of contemporary pieces that reflect the tram and train network and this concept of moving along a line.   The tram and train system was crucial to the growth of Croydon as a major suburb of London.  The town grew quickly in the 1930’s and the art deco colours are used in the artworks.

A new development of blocks of apartments is difficult to navigate so Tom’s design includes signage for each of the blocks.  The signs relate each individual block to each other and the  ‘map’ at the entrance shows the arrangement around the inner street.  They are colour coded for easy reference and look very classy beside each entrance.   The colour scheme and repeated lines are taken from the main artwork, a panel of repeating lines representing the network of infrastructure and movement along it from station to station.   The piece although flat has a 3D effect particularly when viewed from different ends of the inner street – moving along the line and looking back the artwork appears to fold.

Tom Pearman has also completed another impressive commission for the Mayor of London as part of the ‘Clean Air Campaign’.    He has a very clear, often humorous, graphic style that is well-developed but always reflects the place and the community represented by the artworks.  This is the mark of a high quality public artist.

Working in conjunction with Bellway Homes.

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